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How To Make Your Name Professionally

Think of yourself as a product on a grocery store shelf: Do you want to be a popular, sought-after brand like Kraft or do you want to be a generic, lifeless brand?

In many ways you’re viewed in your professional life like a brand in a grocery store. Without a shiny packaging, you’re just another cheap commodity that anyone can buy anywhere. But as a powerful and recognizable brand, you can charge more, appear more valuable, and ultimately get chosen over the generic guy next to you.

Much like popular brand names don’t appear overnight, making a professional name for yourself and raking in huge checks doesn’t happen incidentally. It takes a ton of work and requires you to leverage every possible outlet to get your professional name out there. Fortunately, making your name professional doesn’t require a huge marketing budget or a big name PR firm. You can do all the hard stuff yourself.

'Accomplishments' to Leave off Your Resume

In today's competitive job market, you need to show hiring managers that you can make an immediate contribution to a new employer. Including your biggest professional successes in the "Accomplishments" section of your resume is an effective way to do just that.

But keep in mind that any achievement you cite should be a) truly noteworthy, b) relevant to your current career goals and c) relatively recent. Far too often, job seekers miss the mark. For instance, you're unlikely to impress prospective employers by highlighting the fact that you were a finalist in a local pageant held in 1982 -- as one real-life job candidate did.

Following are more examples from resumes collected by Robert Half International that feature "accomplishments" that aren't worth mentioning in your resume, as well as advice for crafting statements that will catch a hiring manager's attention:

Graduating with a plan of action

Congratulations, you’ve just graduated with a degree in your chosen field. So what’s your next step going to be to launch your long-anticipated career? Like a young racehorse at the starting gate, you have tons of energy and determination, and are anxious to get out there and seize new career opportunities. But are you ready? Do you know what you need to do? Do you have a plan of action to turn those opportunities into a reality? If you don’t, you will need to get one.

I’m sure you’ve heard the old adage that the quickest route from point A to point B is a straight line. Well, launching your career is no different in terms of setting your job search goals and carrying them out diligently and methodically. You might have a few corners to navigate, but you should do your best to avoid deviating from your goal as much as possible.

One of the first things you need to decide is what type of job interests you the most. Depending on what your degree is, there might be many positions in your field to consider. For example, if you are a graduate nurse you can work in a hospital, clinic, nursing home, childcare center, school, private practice, or field setting. Then, within those settings you can work within various units such as medical-surgical, pediatrics, and maternity. Then there are transitional opportunities. Let’s say you tried your hand at nursing and realized it was not what you expected. You can always consider pharmaceutical sales as a new career. Some fields, such as business management, are even more flexible. The key is to decide which direction you are headed towards and learn as much about that field as you possible can.

What Your Desk Says About You

The accepted aesthetic of the modern office have unfolded and changed through the generations as dramatically as the typewriter’s evolution into the desktop PC. Few employers continue to force draconian, sterile environments upon their people; they now encourage flexibility, comfort and personal expression at work -- a concession that’s best proved by the personalization of your desk.

Now, that’s all very well -- thank goodness our days are no longer spent staring at Bartleby’s “dead-wall” -- but while corporate policy may have changed, human nature has not. This means that what your desk says about you will serve as the basis for what others will think about you.

You see, your desk is where your boss hovers over your shoulder, where clients will wait for your return and where your peers will judge you as they leave the office for lunch. As the rookie in the office, you may want to carefully consider what your desk says about you, but that’s not to say that the oldest veteran is free to express his inner salsa dancer. The calculated management of your workspace and the careful consideration of what your desk says about you are imperative if you seek to impress.

We've compiled some suggestions to help you make sure that what your desk says about you is positive.

Student Résumés: A Guide

Students are often worried about writing a résumé and it’s not uncommon to struggle with the task. But it doesn’t have to be intimidating if you understand the goal of your résumé - to generate interest and interviews. It doesn’t have to get you a job and it doesn’t need to cover your life history. It simply has to pique the interest of the reader and answer the only question he cares about: will this candidate add value to my company?

If you focus your résumé on answering this question effectively, employers will be interested to meet with you. It really is that simple.

Of course, in order to demonstrate your value, you need to know what potential employers are looking for. Start by researching job postings that interest you. Look for frequently-mentioned requirements. Ask experienced professionals what they consider important when they make hiring decisions. Read professional publications and websites related to your target industry. Once you know what is important to employers you can create target your résumé to address those issues.

The Best Resume Ideas

Resume Sometimes it's really hard to come up with good resume ideas. Most of us don't where to begin.

Here are put together a point by point roadmap to help get you thinking in the right direction. Your resume is a good opportunity to showcase what you've done. Don't be shy! Let's get started.

Resume Ideas

  1. Make a chronological list of every company you've worked for, including your dates of employment. Note where they're located.
  2. Make a list of every school you've attended (post high school) and degree conferred. Add to this list any professional training you've received (e.g. sales training courses).
  3. Write a brief description for each of your employers. For example:
  4. A $500 million manufacturer of computer peripherals, with operations in the U.S., Europe and Asia.

Cannot find a Job: Why?

Scared If you start asking yourself this question, this is not a good sign at all – there is something to think about. However, there is no reason for totally freaking out. You are not the only one: thousands of job seekers are getting increasingly frustrated, because they keep searching, but cannot find a job they want. It might be even worse, if you are currently unemployed or looking forward to running away from your present working place that you hate from the deep of your heart.

Let’s see what could be the reasons for your job hunt taking so long:

Variant 1: No Interviews.

If this is the case, you really need to review (and consequently rewrite) your resume and cover letter. Those, basically, are specially designed for getting you invitations for interviews; your resume and cover letter should be selling you to the potential employer, convincing them that they will never find anybody better than you to fill the vacant position. If you are not getting interviews, your curriculum vitae and cover letter are not good enough and need to be redone in a proper way.

You might also want to review your references – are they positive, encouraging the human resources representatives to contact you directly and make an appointment? Or are they cutting off your potential communication with the head hunters?

Another reason why you are not invited for a face to face talk with prospective employers could be that you are applying for wrong positions. Is it that you are trying to get a job position that you have just no chance of getting? Think about that. Be more realistic and do not waste your time.

Job Fair: Useful Tips

Job Fair Visiting a job fair may significantly increase your chances to get a job even faster than you might have thought. You just need to be prepared to “hit” the potential employers. This article will give you some useful tips on how to be a success at a job fair.

Resume.

Review and update it, making sure that the contents reflect the kind of job you are currently looking for. Even if your previous working experience is not too much relevant to it, adjust your resume to your needs – stress out the points that could give you an advantage in job hunting in the desired field. Make many copies of the resume so that you can take a bunch of them to the job fair – you are going to meet quite a lot of prospective employers there.

Introduction.

Think of a brief presentation, that you could use to introduce yourself. It should be like a 40-60 seconds’ commercial, outlining the main points and aimed at making a good impression. A fresh, bright, upbeat presentation will help you grab the recruiter’s attention and get them interested in employing you.

Confidential Job Hunting

Confidential The last thing in the world you want to happen is your current boss getting to know that you are searching for a new job. Employers normally do support career development, but only within their own company. Here are some useful tips of how to avoid the awkward situation when you have to explain why you are going for job interviews and, basically, considering a job change.

Never involve company facilities usage into your job search.

This includes phone line, Internet, fax, and computer. Many employers monitor Internet usage and check phone logs. It is also not secure to store your resume and cover letter, job applications, references from former employers and correspondence with potential ones, - somebody can just come across with them accidentally and, believe me, will get very suspicious.

Never use your business email address for this purpose.

You might think that it looks more professional, when the email address on your resume contains the name of your company, but you are not quite right. First, you destroy the idea of confidential job search, letting everybody know who you are. Second, in many companies business email address usage is prohibited for personal purposes, and your employer might be reviewing the external email traffic, and might quite easily discover that you are job hunting. You should rather use a personal email account or set up a free of charge mailbox at gmail.com, for example.

Job Interview: Don’ts

Stop Sign1. Don’t expect that your resume will do the selling job for you. Yes, it is good to have an excellent CV with perfect qualifications, but the printed text will stay the printed text for ever unless your prospective employer hears about your skills from you personally. Your job here is to add color and challenge to your professional achievements. Make them believe that you did a great job.

2. Don’t give simple answers such as ‘yes’ or ‘no’ unless it cannot be another way. A job interview is the time for you to impress the interviewer, to give the detail that does not fit into your resume. However, try to limit the answer to each question to 60 seconds – many recruiters claim it is the most acceptable timing.

3. Don’t complain about your current / former employer, no matter how bad they are. Your prospective employer should think that you are longing to work for them, because you are searching for a job which is more challenge, more interest for you. The fact that your payment was low, you did not have vacation and had to work overtime would not contribute to your being a prospective employee. Actually, the best time to search for a job is when you are happy with you current position and do not need any change. In this case you can get the best position you have ever dreamed about.

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