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Where the Jobs Will Be Next Year

Where will you be in 2010? With an economy on the mend and renewed optimism towards job creation, many are considering upgrading their education and job status. With the right education, you could be among the successful job seekers in 2010.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) listed its occupations with the largest number of total job openings due to growth and net replacements from 2006 through 2016. Check out a few of the jobs that made the cut, and find out how you can use career training to secure a new position.

Career #1: Registered Nurses

This popular health care career tops the list with an amazing amount of projected growth. Over a million new jobs for registered nurses are expected to open up through 2016. And unlike some medical careers, you don't need to work through years of medical school; some registered nurses earn an associate's degree. The BLS reports that registered nurses earned mean annual wages of $65,130 in 2008, making nursing a caring career with real rewards.

Career #2: Child Care Workers

Working with children means having a fun and engaging career with a high level of potential job growth. About 646,000 new jobs are expected to open up through 2016. While entry level jobs in child care may be found with brief certification or on-the-job training, more lucrative management positions may require an associate's or bachelor's degree in child care management. Preschool education administrators earned mean annual wages of $46,370 in 2008, the BLS reports.

Career #3: Accounting Clerks

The clerks who assist accountants are expected to enjoy some job growth; about 594,000 new jobs through 2016. While fully licensed accountants typically need a bachelor's degree plus certification, accounting clerks typically need only an associate's degree in accounting. The BLS reports that accounting clerks earned mean annual wages of $33,800 in 2008. Earn your degree online, and you might not need to make any changes to your current work schedule while you train.

Career #4: Executive Secretaries

Far from an ordinary secretarial job, this career comes with the distinction of working at the top of the secretarial career ladder. Executive secretaries perform high-level administrative support, working closely with executives and other top staff. Training and supervisory duties are often expected, and executive secretaries often hold at least an associate's degree in office administration. These trained pros earned mean annual wages of $42,340 in 2008, according to the BLS, and about 497,000 new careers are expected to open up through 2016.

Career #5: Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers

If you have some retail work experience and you're looking for a leg up, take heart; this is one career with a lot of growth potential. The BLS projects that about 352,000 new jobs for retail sales supervisors are expected to open up through 2016. What's more, the degree profile for the job is somewhat broad, meaning that the type of bachelor's degree you earn doesn't matter as much as the fact of the degree itself. For the most competitive management careers, a master's degree in business may be recommended. Supervisors of retail sales workers earned mean annual wages of $39,910 in 2008, the BLS notes.

Students Consider Online Career Training

Thinking of training for some of the hottest jobs of the future? Completing your career training online has specific benefits. You can attend school and study on your time without the hassle of travel and required classroom attendance. Many full-time workers even choose to keep their jobs while studying online.

While no degree can guarantee a particular career or salary, the practical training you'll receive in an online associate's, bachelor's, or master's degree program can give you the preparation you need to compete for these popular future careers. Even though hundreds of thousands of new jobs are expected to open up, you should always be prepared to experience competition for the best careers. Completing career training beforehand helps you face that competition.

by Mary Fineday, www.FindtheRightSchool.com

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